10 Flower Pack - Homegrown Garden

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Home Grown is a small family-owned company with a love for

gardening. From our own backyard, we have cultivated a passion

for gardening that we want to share. We believe that it should be

accessible to everyone, fun, and easy to start. Our goal at Home

Grown is to .provide you with the best quality products and services.

Our team has spent years sourcing and creating products that help

everyone, from beginner to experienced gardeners alike

No green thumb? No worries!

We made sure that no green thumb is required to help you have your

dream of gardening come true by providing you detailed instructions

and guides which are included in all of our seed packs and kits.

We hope you experience the same joy we have found for

gardening.

If you are looking for a variety of

colorful flowers that can be planted

either in spring or fall, then you’re in

luck! Our flower seed pack contains 10

species of annual flowers, but many of

them will self-seed and return again the

following spring!

Autumn Beauty sunflower is a gorgeous

variety that offers a beautiful mix of warm

colors including orange, bronze, red, and

yellow. Some of the blooms are even

multi-colored. Autumn Beauty sunflower is

believed to have first been harvested for use

by Native American tribes dating back as

far as 2000 B.C. Established Autumn Beauty

sunflowers can tolerate drought but make

sure to regularly water during the flowering

period. Since the plant grows up to 8 feet,

the stems may droop to the weight of the

flowers. Use stakes and twine to support the

plant.


Sowing Indoors

Autumn Beauty sunflower can be started indoors in about 6 to 8

weeks prior to the last frost. Use small pots, trays, or other containers

that are at least 6 inches deep. The seeds should be planted 1/2

inch beneath the surface of the soil. Autumn Beauty sunflower can

be germinated in groups with 3 seeds together or individually. Be

sure to allow several inches of space between each seed or group

of seeds. The soil should be kept moist at all times while taking care

not to overwater the seeds. Keep the planter in a bright place. The

germination process typically takes 10 to 21 days.

Transplanting

When spring has arrived and there is no longer any danger of frost

conditions, Autumn Beauty sunflower seedlings can be safely

planted outdoors. Choose an area of ground with plenty of sunlight.

The seedlings should be planted approximately 12 inches apart. To

allow easier care and harvesting, plant the seedlings in straight rows

with 20 to 24 inches between each row. The soil should be kept moist

but not wet.

Sowing Outdoors

Directly sow outside in spring when the danger of frost conditions

has passed. Select an area that receives ample sunlight throughout

the day. Clean the area from weeds and loosen the soil. Sow the

seeds at the depth of 1/2 to 1 inch. Space the seeds approximately 12

inches apart and keep moist. If planting multiple plants, leave 20 to

24 inches between the rows.

Harvest and Use

Autumn Beauty sunflower will be ready for harvest once the flowers

have died back completely. The back of each flower head should be

brown. Cut the flower head, leaving 5 to 10 inches of stem and hang

to dry. When dried, rub the flower head over the bucket to catch seeds.
Some of the most common 
uses for Autumn Beauty sunflower include the 
production of cooking oil, margarine, broths, salads, cakes, and other desserts.

Sunflower seeds also make a great snack!

One of the most popular species in the floral

industry, baby’s breath blooms are usually

used as fillers in flower bouquets and are

used in rustic-themed weddings and other

events. But planted in gardens, they can

provide a serene setting with their small

white or pink buds. An ideal choice for a

beginner gardener, this flowering plant is

fast-growing and easy to maintain. As a

bonus, it will bring a number of beneficial

pollinators to your garden!


Sowing Indoors

To get an early start, sow baby’s breath seeds indoors approximately 6 to 8
weeks before the last spring frost. Use a seed starting tray filled with well-

drained soil. Place seeds 1/4 inch deep and keep the soil moist until

germination. Keep the planter with seeds in a warm, bright site. For

best results, ensure that soil temperature is at least 70°F. Under the

right conditions, you will see the first sprouts in about two to three

weeks.

Transplanting

When seedlings sprout 2 pairs of leaves and all danger of frost has

passed, start hardening them off. Do this by bringing the planter

outside for a few hours per day and then gradually increasing their

time outdoors each day until they’re fully adapted to outdoor

growing conditions. Before transplanting to the garden, prepare the

soil bed by removing weeds and loosening the soil. Place the plants 9

inches apart and water generously.

Sowing Outdoors

Start preparing to plant outside when the danger of frost has passed.

Select an area in the garden that receives full sunlight. Prepare the

area by removing weeds and loosening the soil. Sow seeds 1/4 inch

deep and 9 inches apart. Keep the soil moist until germination. You

can sow baby’s breath two times per season as they’re fast growers.

Another option is sowing in the fall for early spring blooms. In this

case, sow the seeds a little deeper than usual.

Care

Remove weeds regularly as these compete with the nutrients baby’s

breath gets from the soil. Water at least once a week or when the

soil is dry. Overwatering may cause root rot, so be careful! For flower

arrangements or for use in bouquets, cut long stems. For longer

display life, select flowers that are not fully opened yet.

One of the easiest flowers to grow, California

Giant zinnia is a stunning variety that

produces remarkably large blooms in

wonderful shades of yellow, orange, red,

pink, purple, and white. This enormous

annual plant blooms all summer long,

attracting a number of butterfly species.

California Giant zinnia is a tough variety that

withstands drought fairly well and it’s often

used in xeriscaping.


Sowing Indoors

To get an early start, California Giant zinnia can be started indoors—just be sure to
 
handle the transplants very carefully as they are extremely sensitive.
Start seeds indoors, about 4 to 6 weeks 
before the last frost date in your area.
Prepare a seed starting tray 
and fill it with fertile, well-drained soil.
Sow 3 to 4 seeds per cell at 
the depth of 1/4 inch and water thoroughly, but gently.
Keep the 
soil constantly moist until germination occurs. The optimal soil

temperature needed for germination is anywhere between 70°F and

80°F.

Transplanting

Transfer the seedlings during spring or when the temperature is at

least 70°F and there’s no longer any risk of frost. Be sure to harden

them off by bringing trays outside for a few hours per day and then

gradually increasing their time outside each day until they can spend

a whole day outdoors. Thin the seedlings to the strongest, and plant

them approximately 12 to 18 inches apart. Do this carefully as they’re

extremely sensitive to transplanting. Water the seedlings thoroughly

and water regularly until established.

Sowing Outdoors

California Giant zinnia is best sown directly into the garden, in fertile,

well-drained soil. Sow seed directly in the spring, once the soil is

warm enough (at least 70°F) and there’s no longer any risk of frost.

The best time to direct-seed is 1 to 2 weeks after the last spring frost.

Seeds should be planted at the depth of 1/4 inch. When 3 inches tall,

thin the seedlings if they seem too crowded. Water gently. Direct-

seeding in early spring is particularly recommended for warm, frost-

free areas.

Care

California Giant zinnia prefers rich, well-drained soil. It is relatively

drought-tolerant, but you can water the plant during prolonged

periods of drought. Pinch off the stems to promote bushier growth

and deadhead spent flowers to encourage more blooms. Zinnia

makes for a great cut flower; for a longer display, choose blooms that

are not fully opened. Fertilize occasionally.

Crackerjack marigold is an heirloom hybrid

variety that boasts impressively large, fully

double flowers that come in several shades

of yellow and orange. A perfect choice for

beds, borders, and path edges, as well as for

container planting. Crackerjack marigolds

are easily grown from seeds and they make

vibrant, long-lasting cut flowers. They

handle heat very well and usually continue

producing blooms throughout the entire

summer.


Sowing Indoors

For an earlier start, sow your Crackerjack marigolds indoors 6 to 8 weeks
prior to the last spring frost date in your zone. Using a seed starting tray filled

with a seed starting soil mix, sow marigold seeds at the depth of 1/4

inch. Sow several seeds per cell, as you will thin your seedlings once

they’re big enough. Keep evenly moist and maintain a steady soil

temperature of around 70°F–75°F. The seeds should germinate in a

week or two.

Transplanting

Once there’s no longer any risk of frost, your marigold seedlings

can be safely moved outdoors. Thin your transplants and leave only

the strongest ones. Prepare a planting site by breaking the soil and

adding garden compost. Plant seedlings 12 to 18 inches apart and

water thoroughly after planting. Water seedlings regularly until

established.

Sowing Outdoors

Crackerjack marigold seeds can be sown directly into the garden. The

best time for direct sowing is early spring in warmer climates or two

weeks after the last spring frost in cooler regions, when the soil has

warmed up to 70°F. Sow 2 to 3 seeds every 12 to 18 inches and cover

with 1/4 inch of soil. Water thoroughly.

Care

Crackerjack marigold seeds can be sown directly into the garden. The

best time for direct sowing is early spring in warmer climates or two

weeks after the last spring frost in cooler regions, when the soil has

warmed up to 70°F. Sow 2 to 3 seeds every 12 to 18 inches and cover

with 1/4 inch of soil. Water thoroughly.

Fancy Mix calendula includes a wonderful

selection of yellow, orange, and orange-red

flowers. Regarded not only for its ornamental

features but also for its medicinal properties,

calendula is appreciated for its numerous

health benefits. As an ornamental, calendula

makes a great choice for beds and borders,

as well as for containers and pots. It is a

natural mosquito-repellent but will attract a

number of beneficial pollinators such as bees

and butterflies. During hot summer days,

your calendula may produce fewer flowers

but will continue at the regular pace as soon

as the growing conditions become favorable

again.


Sowing Indoors

Calendula seeds are best sown directly into the garden, though you

can start them indoors as well. If sowing indoors, start the seeds 6 to

8 weeks before the last spring frost in your area. Use seed starter trays

filled with a seed starting soil mix and sow several seeds per cell. Sow

them at the depth of 1/4 inch. Keep the soil moist and place the tray

in a warm and bright place. The optimal soil temperature needed for

germination is anywhere between 50°F and 65°F.

Transplanting

Once your indoor seedlings are 2 to 3 inches tall and all danger of

frost has passed, you can transplant the seedling outdoors. Thin them

and use only the strongest seedlings. Plant them 12 to 18 inches

apart. Keep the area well-watered until plants become established.

Sowing Outdoors

Direct sowing can be done in spring and fall. In spring, wait until the

soil is warm enough (at least 60°F) and sow the seeds 2 to 3 inches

apart. After a few weeks, thin them to 12 to 18 inches. In fall, sow

the seeds after the first frosts start to hit, but before the soil freezes.

When sown in spring, calendula will bloom in a few weeks, but when

sown in fall, it will bloom the following season.

Harvest and Use

Calendula flowers can be cut for flower arrangements or harvested

for drying. When picking calendula flowers for drying, harvest them

on sunny days, around noon, after the dew has dried. Pick the half-

open flowers as they’re the most potent. Harvest regularly; the more

you harvest, the more flowers each plant will produce. Let flowers dry

in a dark, cool, and well-ventilated place. Once they’re dried, pluck

the petals and store them in a glass jar. Dried calendula flowers make

a wonderful, soothing tea. Flowers and petals can also be used as a

garnish, either fresh or dried.

Heavenly Blue morning glory is an award-

winning cultivar that features large, azure-

blue flowers. Named after its flowers that

open in the morning and close in the

afternoon, morning glories will bloom all

summer long. Thanks to its climbing growth

habit, this vine makes a great choice for

growing against a fence, wall, or trellis.

Resistant to deer, but attractive to butterflies

and hummingbirds, Heavenly Blue is low-

care and virtually pest-free.


Seed Treatment

For the optimal germination rate, morning glory seeds
require scarification and a short period of stratification. To scarify the seeds,
gently cut the seeds’ coat 
with a clean knife, but be sure not to damage the interior.
You can 
also use sandpaper to remove the coating in one small area. Soak

the seeds in warm water for 12 to 24 hours. Seeds that have been

scarified and stratified should be sown as soon as possible.

Sowing Indoors

Start your seeds indoors approximately 4 to 6 weeks before the last

expected frost in your area. Use a large container or a seed starting

tray and sow the seeds at the depth of 1/4 inch, spacing them 2 to 3

inches apart. Water the soil gently and keep the substrate constantly

moist. The seeds will germinate when the soil temperature ranges

between 65°F and 80°F.

Transplanting

Once your seedlings are 2 to 3 inches tall, they are ready to be

transplanted outside. Be sure that all danger of frost has passed,

otherwise, your seedlings may become damaged. Find a full-sun

position for your morning glory seedlings and install some kind of

support (trellis, lattice, fence, or pergola). When planting multiple

plants, space them 1 to 2 feet apart. Water the seedlings thoroughly

after planting and water regularly until established.

Sowing Outdoors

Morning glory seeds can be direct-sown in spring, when the soil

has warmed to approximately 65°F or 2 weeks after the last frost in

your area. As mentioned above, prior to sowing, install some kind of

support. Sow the seeds every 6 to 12 inches and water thoroughly.

When the seedlings are 2 to 3 inches tall, thin them to 1 to 2 feet

apart.

Care

Heavenly Blue morning glory prefers moderately fertile, but well-

drained soil. It has moderate watering requirements but will benefit

from extra water during hot spells or prolonged periods of drought.

Regularly remove the spent flowers to promote more blooms.

Removing the flowers will also prevent the plant from reseeding.

Luminosa zinnia is an amazing variety that

will add bright pink colors to your garden

with its remarkable large blooms. Spring is

the perfect time to plant Luminosa zinnia to

see the gorgeous blooms all summer long.

This low-care plant is fairly drought-tolerant

but will bloom better with regular watering.

With its wonderful blooms, it attracts a

number of beneficial pollinators.


Sowing Indoors

Luminosa zinnia can be started indoors— just be sure to handle
the transplants very 
carefully as they are extremely sensitive.

When starting indoors, prepare a seed starting tray and fill it with well-drained soil
4 to 6 weeks before 
the last frost date in your area. Sow 3 to 4 seeds per cell and keep

moist until germination. The optimal soil temperature needed for

germination is anywhere between 70°F and 80°F.

Transplanting

When it is warm enough outside or after the last spring frost, transfer

the seedlings from the seed starting tray outside. Be sure to harden

them off by bringing trays outside for a few hours per day and

then gradually increasing their time outside each day until they’re

fully adapted to outdoor growing conditions. Pick the strongest

seedlings and plant them in an area that receives full sunlight. Plant

the seedlings 12 to 24 inches apart and water regularly until the

stems are strong and upright. Do this carefully as zinnia seedlings are

extremely sensitive to transplanting. Water the seedlings thoroughly

and water regularly until established.

Sowing Outdoors

To start zinnias outdoors, sow the seeds directly into the garden

when the soil has warmed up to at least 70°F. This usually happens

1 to 2 weeks after the last spring frost. Sow them 1/4 inch deep 6 inches apart.
Water thoroughly. When 3 inches tall, thin to 12 to 24

inches. Direct-seeding in early spring is particularly recommended in

warm, frost-free areas.

Care

Luminosa zinnia prefers rich, well-drained soil. It is relatively drought-

tolerant, but you can water the plant during prolonged periods

of drought. Pinch off the stems to promote bushier growth and

deadhead spent flowers to encourage more blooms. Zinnia makes

for a great cut flower; for a longer display, choose blooms that are not

fully opened. Fertilize occasionally.

Polka Dot bachelor’s button is an old-

fashioned cultivar that literally adds a splash

of colors to your garden as it produces lovely

blue, purple, pink, and white flowers. Planted

during spring or fall, this hardy annual

plant blooms prolifically late into summer,

attracting pollinators such as butterflies

and bees. This low-maintenance annual is a

perfect choice for bed and borders, as well

as for cutting, but it’s also renowned for its

edible flowers. Removing spent flowers will

promote even more blooms. Despite its

charming look, bachelor’s button is invasive

in some US states, so be sure to check

whether it’s permitted in your area.


Sowing Indoors

Polka Dot bachelor’s button seedlings do not respond well to

transplanting so starting indoors is usually not advised.

Sowing Outdoors

In cool climates, Polka Dot bachelor’s button should be sown directly

in spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Find a part of your

garden that receives full sunlight. Plant the seeds 1/8 inch deep 6 to

8 inches apart. Water thoroughly, but gently, and keep well-watered

until established. Being a self-seeding variety, once planted, it will

come back each spring.

Bachelor’s button can be sown directly in fall. The seeds will

germinate the following spring. In mild winter areas, bachelor’s

button is best sown in fall.

Harvest and Use

Polka Dot bachelor’s buttons are perfect for fresh and dried flower

bouquets and arrangements. The flower petals are edible—they have

a peppery taste with cloves undertone. Use as a garnish for salads,

cheese plates, and desserts. These can also be used in brewing tea.

Sensation cosmos produces masses of

tall, daisy-like flowers that come in several

shades of white, pink, and crimson. These

large, 3–4 inches blossoms attract butterflies

and make for wonderful cut flowers. They

will bloom way into the fall until the first

frosts hit. Thanks to their ability to self-seed,

the flowers will come back next spring. An

extremely drought-tolerant plant, cosmos

will give you an abundance of blooms

without much care.


Sowing Indoors

To get an early start, you can start cosmos seeds indoors,
6 to 8 weeks before the last spring frost date in your area. Using a container or a
seed starting 
tray, sow the seeds at the depth of 1/4 inch, spacing them 2 to 3

inches apart. The soil should be constantly damp, but not overly

wet. Keep the planter in a warm place that receives a lot of indirect

light. When the soil temperature is around 64°F–77°F, the seeds will

probably germinate in less than 10 days.

Transplanting

When all danger of frost has passed and your seedlings are 2 to

3 inches tall, harden them off before transplanting them into the

garden. Bring them outside for just a couple of hours per day and

then gradually increase their time outside each day until they can

spend a whole day outdoors. This way, your seedlings will acclimatize

to the outdoor growing conditions such as hot sun and wind.

When your seedlings are adapted to the outdoor environment,

transplant them into their permanent garden place by spacing them

approximately 18 inches apart. Water the seedlings regularly until

they become established.

Sowing Outdoors

Direct-seed in spring around the last frost, or in the fall after the first

killing frost. Scatter the seeds over the area and cover them with

a thin layer of soil. Keep the area moist. When seedlings are 2 to 3

inches tall, thin if they seem too crowded. When sown in spring,

cosmos will bloom within a few weeks, but when sown in the fall, it

will bloom the following season.

Care

Cosmos is an extremely low-care plant that can withstand drought

very well. Water only if you notice that plants are starting to wilt. Cut

the blooms to promote bushier growth and more flowers. If you’d like

to prevent cosmos from reseeding, remove the flowers before they

go to seed.

Tall Blue is a classic bachelor’s button cultivar

that produces brilliant blue flowers with

purple hues in the center. True to its name,

this fantastic cultivar grows tall at a height

of up to 36 inches or around 3 feet. A great

choice for beginners, this easy-to-grow

cultivar produces blooms all summer long.

When regularly harvested, it will produce

even more blooms. Great for bed and

borders, as well as for cutting, this flower is

also noted for its edible petals. Despite its

charming look, bachelor’s button is invasive

in some US states, so be sure to check

whether it’s permitted in your area.


Sowing Indoors

Tall Blue bachelor’s button seedlings do not respond well to

transplanting so starting indoors is usually not advised.

Showing Outdoors

In cool climates, Tall Blue bachelor’s button should be sown directly

into the garden once as soon as the soil can be worked. Start sowing

outdoors when the soil temperature is at least 70°F. Find a part of

your garden that receives full sunlight. Prepare the garden bed by

loosening the soil and removing weeds. Plant the seeds 1/8 inch

deep 6 to 8 inches apart. Water thoroughly, but gently, and keep

well-watered until established. Being a self-seeding variety, once

planted, it will come back each spring.

Bachelor’s button can be sown directly in fall. The seeds will

germinate the following spring. In mild winter areas, bachelor’s

button is best sown in fall.

Sowing Outdoors

Direct-seed in spring around the last frost, or in the fall after the first

killing frost. Scatter the seeds over the area and cover them with

a thin layer of soil. Keep the area moist. When seedlings are 2 to 3

inches tall, thin if they seem too crowded. When sown in spring,

cosmos will bloom within a few weeks, but when sown in the fall, it

will bloom the following season.

Harvest and Use

Tall Blue bachelor’s buttons make a great cut flower

for fresh and dried flower bouquets and flower

arrangements. The flower petals are edible—they have

a peppery taste with cloves undertone. Use as a garnish

for salads, cheese plates, and desserts. These can also be

used in brewing tea.

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