HG 4 Kales Grow Guide - Homegrown Garden

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Home Grown is a small family-owned company with a love for

gardening. From our own backyard, we have cultivated a passion

for gardening that we want to share. We believe that it should be

accessible to everyone, fun, and easy to start. Our goal at Home

Grown is to .provide you with the best quality products and services.

Our team has spent years sourcing and creating products that help

everyone, from beginner to experienced gardeners alike


No green thumb? No worries!

We made sure that no green thumb is required to help you have your

dream of gardening come true by providing you detailed instructions

and guides which are included in all of our seed packs and kits.

We hope you experience the same joy we have found for

gardening.

Enjoy our amazing selection of 4 kale varieties that offer a wonderful

mix of flavors and textures. After being exposed to frost, their taste

becomes sweeter!

Kale is a healthy and versatile cool-season crop that doesn’t like very

hot weather. For optimal results in areas with a short growing season,

kale is best sown in early spring or in midsummer for a fall crop. In

mild and warm areas, sow kale in midwinter and again in fall.

Transplanting Tips

Kale transplants can be planted into the garden 2 to 3 weeks before

the last average frost in your area. These frost-hardy plants can

withstand temperatures as low as 14°F, but if temperatures are likely

to drop down even more, cover your transplants during the night!

CONTENT (Click on the type of Kale below to go to its guide)


A highly alluring variety of kale, Blue Scotch

is a cultivar with distinctively wrinkled, blue-

green leaves. Nutritious and ornamental at

the same time, this variety is also regarded as

one of the hardiest. This plant prefers cooler

weather and is best planted in early spring

or late summer for a fall harvest. In zone 6

and warmer, this plant can be harvested all

winter long.


Sowing Indoors

Start to sow indoors around 6 weeks before the last frost in your area.
Prepare a seed 
starting tray filled with well-drained soil and

press 3 seeds in one cell 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. Water and moisten until
germination and keep the tray in a warm 
place that receives bright sunlight.
Kale seeds will sprout when the 
soil temperatures are as low as 40°F,
though the optimal range is 
anywhere between 45°F and 80°F.

Transplanting

Transplant kale plants outdoors, approximately 1 to 2 weeks before

the last frost. Prepare your bed by turning the soil over and removing

stones and weeds. Seedlings are ready to transplant when they are

approximately 6 inches tall. Plant them in fertile, well-drained soil. A

bit of shade is fine. Space plants about a foot apart in rows that are

two feet apart. Water deeply and continue providing water during

dry periods to encourage uninterrupted growth.

Sowing Outdoors

Blue Scotch kale is a hardy plant that can also be directly sown in

early spring (as soon as the ground can be worked) or in midsummer

for a fall crop. For a fall crop, sow the seeds 3 to 4 months before

the first frost date. Plant your seeds in full sunlight, sowing evenly,

before covering with a 1/4 inch of soil. Firm the soil lightly and water

gently. Keeping the soil moist is important for optimal germination. 

The seeds will germinate when the soil temperatures are anywhere

between 45°F and 80°F. Under the right growing conditions, your

seedlings should emerge in two weeks or less. When several inches

tall, thin to 18 to 24 inches apart.


Harvest and Use

For the sweetest flavor, harvest kale in cool weather, ideally after

a frost. When the plant is touched with the light frost, its taste

becomes sweeter. Pick individual leaves or harvest the entire plant

at one cutting. Allow the central bud of the plant to remain, as this

will generate fresh leaves. Store your kale in the refrigerator for

up to one week or freeze it for long-term storage. This variety is a

popular addition to salads, smoothies, and soups. It is also commonly

prepared as a side dish by simply wilting the leaves in a hot pan with

butter or bacon. You can also use it as a garnish for fish and chicken.

Dwarf Siberian kale is noted for its large,

heavily frilled, green or purple leaves that do

not form heads. Although having the name

“dwarf,” this variety of kale grows up to 16

inches tall. The inner leaves are sweeter than

the outside leaves and make a great addition

to salads. Dwarf Siberian is a frost-tolerant,

extremely cold-hardy kale variety that can be

harvested right through the snow. Prefers full

sun in spring and fall, but can benefit from

light shade during hot weather. It likes well-

drained, fertile soil high in organic matter,

and consistent moisture.


Sowing Indoors

Targeting to plant outside in spring, prepare to plant indoors around

6 weeks before the last frost in your area. Prepare a seed starting tray

with fertile, well-drained soil and push seeds 1/2 inch deep. Moisten

soil regularly and keep the tray in a warm and bright spot. Seeds will

germinate in about 7 days at soil temperatures of 45°F to 80°F.

Transplanting

Thin to the strongest seedlings and transplant outside 1 to 2 weeks

before the last frost. Mix some compost in the soil to promote

healthier and established plants. Space the seedlings 12 to 24 inches

apart. The planting area can receive full sunlight but can also grow

well under a shade especially during hot weather.

Sowing Outdoors

Kale seeds can be directly sown in early spring (as soon as the ground

can be worked) or in midsummer for a fall crop. For a fall crop, sow

the seeds 3 to 4 months before the first frost date. Start by weeding,

loosening the soil, and incorporating fertilizer into the soil. Plant 2 to

3 seeds in the same area and space them 12 to 18 inches apart. When

several inches tall, thin to 24 inches and remove any weak seedlings.

Water until established but take care not to overwater.


Harvest and Use

Siberian kale is amenable to a constant harvest. Harvest can start

when the leaves are at least 8 to 10 inches big. Pick the larger leaves

from the bottom of the plant first and allow the higher leaves to

grow bigger. This selective harvesting will allow you to harvest from a

single plant for many months. The tender young leaves can be eaten

raw, cooked for soup, or used in stir-fries. They can be also used as a

garnish or mixed in smoothies.

Lacinato kale originated from Italy and is also

referred to as Italian, Dinosaur, or Toscana

kale. Dinosaur may be an unusual nickname

for this plant but the bumpy, reptile-skin

texture really justifies the name. It’s an

exceptionally tall variety that grows up to

3 feet tall. As a kitchen ingredient, it can be

easily prepared as both its leaves and ribs

are edible. The large, dark green leaves retain

their crispy texture even when well-cooked.


Sowing Indoors

In areas with a short growing season, kale seeds are best started indoors approximately 

6 weeks before transplanting outside. Prepare a seed starting tray

with fertile, well-drained soil, and push in 2 to 3 seeds in each cell 1/4

inch deep. Moisten and add some compost to aid germination. Keep

the tray in a warm, bright place and try to achieve a soil temperature

of at least 45°F.

Transplanting

Once the seedlings are thinned and the strongest have grown to

6 inches tall, prepare to transplant outside. Do this a week or two

before the last frost date. Mix some compost into well-drained soil

and remove the weeds before setting the seedlings in your garden.

An area that receives full sunlight will help your kale grow more

leaves. Space the plants 24 to 36 inches apart to give them enough

room to grow.

Sowing Outdoors

Lacinato kale seeds are best sown outside during cool weather,

particularly in spring or fall. In spring, sow the seeds as soon as the

soil becomes workable. For fall or winter harvest, sow in midsummer

or fall. Remove the weeds, add some compost, and loosen the soil

before planting the seeds 1/4 inch deep. Space the seeds 4 inches

apart and when they have grown to 6 inches, thin them and retain

the strongest seedlings that will be spaced 24 to 36 inches apart.

Water only when dry until established. Increase watering during hot

spells and drought periods.

Harvest and Use

You can harvest both young and mature leaves. Pick the outer leaves

as the center helps the plant to grow more. Since both the ribs and

leaves of Lacinato kale are edible and delicious, they are very easy to

prepare and incorporate in many recipes. Young leaves can be added

to salads and sandwiches while mature leaves can be made into kale

chips or added into pasta and soups. This wonderful kale variety

is a traditional ingredient of famous Italian dishes minestrone and

ribollita.

Red Russian kale is noted for its tender leaves

which are softer than in other kale varieties.

Originally from Siberia, this super-hardy crop

is remarkably ornamental and extremely

nutritious. It can be distinguished by its frilly,

blue-green leaves with purplish-red stems.

The taste is often described as sweet and

mild. Just like all kale varieties, it does best in

cool weather and it’s hardy to -10°F!


Sowing Indoors

Plant 4 to 6 weeks before the last spring frost date in your area.
Fill a seed starting 
tray with well-drained soil and incorporate some compost.
Plant seeds 1/4 inch deep and keep the soil evenly 
moist.
Keep the tray in a warm, bright place and try to achieve a soil

temperature of at least 45°F. Under the right growing conditions, Red

Russian seeds will germinate in less than 10 days.

Transplanting

When the seedlings are around 6 inches tall, get ready to transplant

them outside. The best time to transplant the seedlings is about a

week or two before the last spring frost date. Prepare the soil bed

by removing weeds, loosening the soil, and adding some compost.

Space the strongest seedlings 12 to 24 inches apart. Water until

established. Once established, ensure that 1 inch top of the soil is

moist.

Sowing Outdoors

Red Russian seeds can be directly sown in early spring (as soon as

the ground can be worked) or in midsummer for a fall crop. Select

an area in your garden that receives full sunlight and prepare the soil

bed. Plant seeds 4 inches apart and water regularly. When several

inches tall, thin the seedlings to the strongest, leaving approximately

12 to 24 inches of space between each plant. Water more frequently

during hot weather but be wary of overwatering.

Harvest and Use

Siberian kale is amenable to a constant harvest. Harvest can start

when the leaves are at least 8 to 10 inches big. Pick the larger leaves

from the bottom of the plant first and allow the higher leaves to

grow bigger. This selective harvesting will allow you to harvest from a

single plant for many months. The tender young leaves can be eaten

raw, cooked for soup, or used in stir-fries. They can be also used as a

garnish or mixed in smoothies.

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